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Kickboxing


Kickboxing
Annalisa Bucci atacks an opponent in a K-1 rule bout
Photo by Filippo Venturi. Resource Flickr
Reprint by the author's permission

Русская версия


Women's kickboxing episodes

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing


Mixed bouts


Kickboxing
Lucia Rijker against male Muai Tai boxer Somchay Jaidi



Sunshine Fettkether knocks out a male opponent



One mode coed contest - Asako Saioka defeated Kiken Takayama

Savate Kickboxing can be described as a generic term for a sporting martial art that, while similar to boxing, uses feet as well as hands for fighting.

Forms of kickboxing that have been labelled under this term include:

- Muay Thai - Thai boxing/kickboxing (strong emphasis on knee and elbow strikes)
- Savate - French kickboxing (Allows the use of shoes)
- San Shou - Chinese Kickboxing (Takedowns and throws are legal)
- Bando - Burmese Kickboxing (Any part of the body may be used to strike and be struck)
- Japanese kickboxing (Similar to Muay Thai, but elbow strikes are prohibited)
- Full Contact Karate - "American" Kickboxing" (Most of the time padding and in some cases body armour is used).

There are many additional deriviatives of these forms, as well as combined styles which have been used in specific competitions (e.g. K-1). The rules of 'kickboxing' also vary between these different styles.
There are two modifications in female kickboxing - full contact and partial contact which more reminds taekwando.

The term kickboxing is disputed and has come to become more associated with the Japanese and American variants. It must be noted that many of the above styles do not consider themselves to be 'kickboxing' as such, although the public uses the term generically to refer to all these martial arts. The term itself was created by the Japanese boxing promoter Osamu Noguchi for a variant of Muay Thai and Karate that he created in the 1950s; this term was later used by the American variant. When used by the practioners of these 2 styles, it tends to refer to them specifically rather than the martial arts they were derived from.

In kickboxing the clear winning is accomplished in the same way as in boxing (knockout, technical knockout, stopping by a referee). Score counting is more complex - as in taekwando kicks are more valuable than punches.


In spite of additional using of legs (which are stronger than arms) this form of female combative sport is, strange as it seems, more sparing than boxing - there are less knockouts and early stoppages as well as bruises and cuts on faces. Usage legs for protection just might be a repressing factor. Besides, according to the special official rules for female kickboxers kicks to body are limited and actually it's quite difficult to kick in the head that is protected by big boxer gloves (which are not used in taekwando). That is the reason why kickboxing was allowed for women long before boxing was (but now the best female kickboxers are moving to better paid boxing, like Rijker and Riley). It would be curious to consider differences in the rules for men and women in boxing and kickboxing. One of the main paragraph of the professional boxing rules says: "All the rules for men and women are identical except mandatory wearing breast protectors by women". In kickboxing there are a lot of special features in the rules for females. The rules of World Kickboxing Federation (WKA) provide female kickboxers with heavier (by 25%) gloves, a protecting bras and groin bandages. Intentional kicks to breasts and kidneys are forbidden. So, a possibility to inflict effective body kicks is limited (although in some competitions the limitations are not taken into account). This difference in limitations for women in boxing and kickboxing might be explained (besides that kicks are more dangerous) by the fact that at the time of female kickboxing formation apprehensions about women health still existed. By the time of the official recognition of female boxing, the feminist movement reached such a high level that any lenience were no longer acceptable - "exactly like men"! But breast protectors remained though.

Among rules common for the both, men and women, we can note such as a ban for kicking to joints, collarbones, spines and for punching while holding an opponent by another hand. Minimum kicks during a round is required in some competitions (usually eight). Unlike taekwando, some female kickboxers quite little use serious attacking kicks preferring punches. In some amateur and show bouts clinches are allowed (at least judges are tolerant to them). During mutual "embraces", opponents might kick each other or turn down to short wrestling in "par terre". Shattering blows by the back of the glove after jerky turn around are also sometimes allowed. Rule violations might be allowed in professional kickboxing as well. Russian kickboxer Natalia Larionova opens up in her interview that judges tend to miss certain illegal moves like hitting by an elbow, blowing to face by the head, kicking to kidneys. "The idea is that people pay money to watch fighting and judges are not going to stop it even you play against the rules".

One of the popular forms of kickboxing is Muai Tai (Tai boxing). In Tailand girls participate in real bouts since early ages. One of the most exciting events in kickboxing was the mixed bout between famous Lucia Rijker (one of the most dangerous female boxer and kick boxer) and an unknown Tai male boxer. Lucia actively attacked him and even had some advantage. However, the man managed to knock her out by punch; as a result she was unconcious for a while.

Surprisingly, the most of female kickboxers are slender and graceful, many of them are atractive and lady-like (there are many more man-like fighters in kickboxing than in boxing). They even demonstrate some elegance during bouts. There are some very chiseled body figures and beautiful faces among female kickboxers. Just for example - already not too young Christine Dupree. Having model appearance, she uses with skill good kickboxing techniques and quite well established punches and kicks. Her moves during fighting are gracious and even being knocked down she manages to look nice and trying to stand up without exerting herself.

The great Russian poet Alexandr Pushkin described a light dynamic beauty (ballerina) in his poem "Evgeny Onegin". Isn't it about such a kickboxer?

She's touching floor just by a foot
Lunging quickly by the other.
And all the sudden, - jumping,
Shining by her slender figure.
Suddenly throws her arm up
And kicks a leg by rapid leg.


Kicking to different body parts



Kicking ass



Kicking breast



Kicking face



Kicking waist



Kicking crotch



Kicking neck



Mutual kicking neck and crotch

Women's kickboxing episodes

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing


Kickboxing
Christine Dupree attacking



Muai Tai



Topless Muai Tai



Forbidden kicking to kidneys


Videoclips


Classic kickboxing od 1990s
Kim Messer (red trunks) defeats Yvonne Trevino


Australian Amanda Buchanan was one of the most dangerous female kickboxers of all the times
Her powerful, explosive and skillful fighting style yields to no men in kickboxing
Amanda fiercely fights for ISKA Australian title with another great fighter and wins


American LaTasha Marzolla, a former Playboy glamour model became a Mixed martial arts fighter and kickboxer
LaTasha is a perfect example of a beautiful lady successfuly acting on the ring.


Yana Kunitskaya of Russia defeats Rotaru Andrea of Moldova


Vera Makresova ("Piranha") of Ukraine is a boxer, kickboxer, karatoka.
Vera won numerous tournaments and championships in various martial arts


>> Combative activities

>> Punches and kicks

>> Muay Thai




Animations


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Pictures from the WEB site Diana the Valkirie - kickboxing techniques






Kickboxing scenes






Muai Tai

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Последнее обновление: 5 сентября 2005

Last updated: September, 5, 2005


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